Water carriers for camping – BPA-free containers

Carrying your own water supply is essential for wild camping, and very handy for everyone else. So, we’ve been looking for the best water containers. Our wishlist? BPA-free, won’t leak, split or spill, easy to fill and preferably with a tap. Disposables are out because there’s way too much plastic rubbish already.

 

Here are our finds, in order of preference – favourites first. What works for you? Let us know by leaving a comment below.


La Nuova Sansone stainless steel beauty

This is our absolute favourite…despite its being useless for backpackers and very expensive. La Sansone make stainless steel containers for water, honey and olive oil. No plastic, no nasty tastes, and what a gorgeous object. No wonder it’s called The Jewel.

The five-litre is probably the optimum for campervanners because it’s liftable (10 litres would be better for longer trips but a bit hefty for some people to carry). Simple screw-in lid with a release valve, a positive tap and shiny gorgeousness. Price…well, you’ll get change from £60.

There are a few on Amazon, but they’re cheaper at French company Bulk & Co. Their shipping charges are reasonable, fast delivery and they have the full range.


The Source Liquitainer

Ranked above the Platypus because we trusted the top seal more and the tap is really good. Proved very handy on the campsite and wild camping.

Its downside is that it’s a bit small at four litres. We like it for its foldability and the fact it also stands up. BPA- and phthalate-free, wide top for easy filling (you can get ice into it too). It uses a material that inhibits bacteria build-up. Just make sure you pull the clip across the top to seal it! Around £20.


Platypus Platy Water Tank

Clever water storage that comes in two-, four- and six-litre options. The wide-mouth, press-close opening is easy to fill and clean (just make sure it’s properly sealed or it’ll spill if it tips). It’s BPA-free and even has a technology to stop the tank getting mouldy or contaminated by bacteria. It stands more or less stable on rough surfaces and has a comfortable handle too. A pouring spout rather than a tap, but nice to pour and water comes out quickly, which can be an advantage (use as a watering can at home!). Costs between £23 and £40. Interesting to see how well it stands up to use.


Jerry cans

As simple and sturdy as it gets, but bulky. These come in a wide range of sizes and with taps in various positions. Very practical. Whether they’re BPA-free is questionable in some cases.

The Ridgemonkey jerry can (recommended to us by an experienced van camper) is a little rough around the edges, but it’s made of HDPE and comes in three sizes. If you want to know a little about which plastics are deemed safe, check out this article. The Ridgemonkeys cost between £12 and £18.


MSR Dromedary and Dromlite

VERY robust and very packable, though needs to be laid flat, these are water bags with a screw-off cap and a nozzle. The Dromedary comes in four- and 10-litre versions and the lighter Dromlite as two-, four- or six-litre versions. There are some concerns about the taste of water in the Dromlite and the watertightness of the main cap, but you can’t get better for resilience or carryability. From around £25, depending on size. Drop it out of a plane and it survives, apparently.


Sea to Summit Pack-Tap

In a four- or 10-litre option, this is a perfectly flat water container with a one-hand operated tap. The inside bladders are mylar (the stuff they make wine bladders out of) and the outside is rip-top nylon, so should be durable and shouldn’t taint your water. Costs between £21 and £30. Great for minimal packing and for avoiding any chance of plastic-y water. Doesn’t quite fit our needs because it isn’t self-standing – you need to hold it while filling and hang it up.


Ortlieb water bag

Ortlieb make good drybags, so they’ve turned that idea inside-out to make bags that keep the water on the inside. They come in four- and 10-litre sizes and have handles for carrying or hanging. No tap, though. Instead there’s a nozzle system that can be adapted for a drinking pipe or for pouring. Around £20. A 10l water sack is their other option, but these can’t be transported horizontally, which might make packing difficult.


Igloo Legend cooler container

An insulated water container with a top handle and sturdy build. Costs around £35 and holds 10 litres. Doesn’t pack away neatly, but an option if you have the space.

 


Kampa Keg

People seem like it but, as with many folding plastic options, they easily puncture or develop leaks where the folds weaken the plastic. About £8.

 


Eurohike roll-up water carrier

Comes with a tap, but is basically a roll-up bag, so super-small when not in use. Won’t stand up and the top isn’t all that secure. Still, it’s only £9.

 


Plastic water bags

From as little as £1, these are the most basic option. Simply a bag with a handle and tap. Made of polyethylene (PE), they tend to come as five- or 10-litre options. You’ll need to hold them while filling as they don’t stand up very well. Won’t last, so you’ll end up adding more plastic to the waste mountain.


Concertina water carriers

We’re not all that keen on this type (which is a more basic form of the Kampa Keg). Again, the folds are a weak area. We also wonder whether they are actually BPA-free…who would know! Guaranteed not to last, so more plastic waste


Hydrate Hive

A bit daft and basically the Kampa Keg again with a weird (detachable) base. 7.5l and around £9. More of a party animal than a bit of practical camping equipment maybe.


Squashy jerry cans

One to avoid. These tend to make water taste unpleasant no matter how well you rinse them out. Mountain Warehouse make one and the one shown here is Yellowstone. Made of PVC.


And to avoid plastic altogether?

A stainless steel jerry can seems an option, but we haven’t been able to find any food-grade models. So…back to the top of the page for our favourite, or have a look at these (impractical?) options.

This stainless steel dispenser has no handles, but perhaps its sleekness will make up for struggling back from the campsite tap with it. Around £40.

Heavy, breakable and with no carrying handle, but this glass five-litre Kilner drinks dispenser would definitely be taste-free and not leach anything nasty into your water. Around £14.

A rather complicated glamorous option. Five-litre capacity stainless steel. Around £45.

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